Public Lab Research note


The Tags page mockup - let me know what you think!

by edie_blues | | 89 views | 18 comments |

Read more: publiclab.org/n/18091


Hello again,

This is Eva again, your friendly web designer :)

I've started working on the https://publiclab.org/tags page design, which is a little bit tricky.

The current tags page offers a lot of information. I think it's great that the user has a chance to see all the tags used - although the sorting function isn't working great (I can't get the "# of people subscribed" to work, for example).

After thinking about it hard I approached this page design with two goals:

1. We need to show the users the tags they might be interested in (but they are not following yet)

2. We need to show the user how to tag correctly

I also threw in a "Random" button to show a random tag and a "Hall of Fame", because those stats are always fun to see.

I think that before we can design a more effective /tags page, the tags will have to be sorted, arranged, perhaps grouped into families so that the "Suggested For Me" functionality will also work better (see the mockup below). I think users might also be more mindful of tagging correctly, once everything is in order.

If the tags were to be sorted, I would replace the current central-block (the table) with a table of contents look, featuring tag families.

Below is a mockup of my progress so far.

As always, please let me know your thoughts! :)

Thanks,

Eva

image description


11 Comments

Thanks Eva! As a "wiki gardener," i have been adding overarching category types of tags such as "water-quality" or "air-quality" "sensors". Perhaps these are "buckets"that could become recommended tags in the future?

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Sharing some design vocabulary from other sites here - i'm interested in:

  1. how each "item" here is shown in a panel which clearly prompts Follow/Join, and shows some indication of other people in that group
  2. how the categorization is in a column, which we might be able to use for a nested list of the featured tags?

Thanks!

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Here is an idea for tag families co-created by @bsugar and @cfastie:

tagboolean.jpg


@liz, i wonder if that's a good inspiration for a manual grouping of the many "featured" tags currently on the top of the /tags page under fewer top-level categories? They could be organized so as not to overwhelm people, whether as they are or in a vertical sidebar:

image.png

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Yes i think it is good inspiration! How can i parent a bunch of tags to make this happen?

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I actually mean just manually sorting them. Will chat at u in a sec. 

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liz wrote:


Yes i think it is good inspiration! How can i parent a bunch of tags to make this happen?


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I'm not entirely sure what you mean by manually sorting them, but I think the problem there would be that some tags belong to both categories. There are two pieces to the tag graph, the calculation of tag co-occurrence (and subsequent removal of co-occurrences below a given threshold), and then the community detection. You might be able to get away with just doing co-occurrences. That code would be easy enough to transfer from python to ruby to run every so often. Now that there is a web dev (hi by the way!) you could also just implement the javascript version of tagoverflow and replace the data.


Hi Benjamin!!! Sorry, i wasn't referring to the giant tag graph, but to the list of tags manually selected and featured at https://publiclab.org/tags. I think, similarly, that it could be challenging to categorize them into 5-6 groups, but even if it's not perfect, it'll be better for people visiting the site to not see so many... it's just a bit too many to be easily read through. I think definitely 7 or fewer would be best to aim for. 

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bsugar wrote:


I'm not entirely sure what you mean by manually sorting them, but I think the problem there would be that some tags belong to both categories. There are two pieces to the tag graph, the calculation of tag co-occurrence (and subsequent removal of co-occurrences below a given threshold), and then the community detection. You might be able to get away with just doing co-occurrences. That code would be easy enough to transfer from python to ruby to run every so often. Now that there is a web dev (hi by the way!) you could also just implement the javascript version of tagoverflow and replace the data.


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Okay, so translating the co-occurrences to Ruby will require a bit more code then I thought it would be (see second paragraph). Unfortunately, I can't find any co-occurrence libraries in Ruby (you might have better luck).

However, there are a bunch of recommendation engines available in Ruby which I guess makes more sense given Ruby's popularity as a back end for websites which inevitably include e-commerce. Reccomendify made sense to me right away. What you could do is instead of users purchasing products , you could treat each post as a user who "purchases" tags. There's also Recommendable but it was more opaque to me.

If you want to use the method that was employed to make the graph above minus the making of the graph, you'd have to translate this code and run it in the Ruby version of these commands. You do not need the export2graphml function.

Essentially, you want a file that looks like this. It won't be hard to calculate the counts of the tags individually, but trickier part is counting the co-occurrences. But once you have those figures, calculating observed to expected ratio is easy and detailed here.


Hi, Benjamin! Thanks for all of this! Perhaps we should move it over to https://github.com/publiclab/plots2/issues/1502 where that graph is posted, or to https://publiclab.org/questions/bsugar/01-25-2018/how-was-the-tag-graph-visualization-made -- it's really helpful; i just don't want to get off the topic here which is actually not about coding but about editorially organizing some of these topic names. Thanks a lot, and great to hear from you!


Hi @warren @liz @stevie (and the rest of Public Lab!),

Following our conversation yesterday, I'm adding two new mockups here :)

Let me know what you think.

Kind regards, Eva

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