Public Lab Research note


Last week in Google Summer of Code

by warren | | 411 views | 1 comments |

Read more: publiclab.org/n/13311


Hi, all -- a smaller update after last week's (which included three weeks worth of changes!). Upgrades continue apace, and a major relaunch of our search functionality is on the horizon.

Thanks as always to our Google Summer of Code (#gsoc) students and mentors! I noticed (see above screenshot) in Github Pulse that I'm no longer the lead contributor (by # of lines of code, I think?) over the past few months. Very cool! And note that this is only the master branch, so @Ujitha and @david-days' work is not shown -- they may also have committed more lines than I.

Ujitha Perera (@Ujitha) writes of the Advanced Search project, which he's working on with @david-days:

Last week I was able to add solr queries for main search queries and made them to working state. This week I'm going to add more details to search results and add more presentable styles for the advanced search page.

Ananyo Maiti (@ananyo2012) writes of the Question and Answer project:

This week I continued to work on the email notification system along with the adding Jasmine tests for plots2 codebase getting merged with Pull Request #618. Also continuing work on friendly urls that change with the title(Pull Request #600). I am now starting with adding Asked questions views in user profile.

Richard Meister (@rmeister) writes of the WebJack project:

I've published two research notes as tutorials (see #webjack) to test the pre-release of WebJack. Also, I investigated what RPC implementations (like Firmata) for Arduino fit best with WebJack.

Lalith Rallabhandi (@Lalith95) writes of the Rich Profiles project:

I worked on building prototype for location tags with hexbins, Added user following and follower relationship. Its almost complete need to complete render part of PR https://github.com/publiclab/plots2/pull/625


1 Comments

Wow a real milestone!

Reply to this comment...


Login to comment.

Public Lab is open for anyone and will always be free. By signing up you'll join a diverse group of community researchers and tap into a lot of grassroots expertise.

Sign up