Question: How long does an inflated neoprene balloon last? Mylar balloons better for summer camp?

pfhs is asking a question about balloon-mapping: Subscribe to answer questions on this topic

pfhs asked on June 03, 2018 05:39
114 | 1 answers | #16426


I am planning a week long summer camp around aerial mapping. My question is how long the balloons in the normal balloon kit (5 ft latex/neoprene) will stay inflated. Can I inflate them, fly them for an hour, bring them back down, store inside, and fly the next day? How many days would they be expected to last without a refill?

Also considering the mylar balloon mini kit for this very reason.

Anyone have experience with this?

Thanks,

matt



2 Comments

Thank you @bronwen! This is our first year, so I think I will get one of each kits and give it a try. I will report back with our successes (and failures...err, challenges!). Next, need to find a place to get helium ;). Thanks again!


Yes, please do share and let us know how your week of aerial mapping goes: that sounds like a great project! When we get helium in NYC we go to a place that supplies industrial gasses (think welding-supply and big hardware stores): you just put a deposit on a tank and return it after-- if you go this way you may need to also rent or buy a regulator nozzle (like this: https://www.amazon.com/Helium-Regulator-Filler-Valve-Balloons/dp/B001T9HBMG). Otherwise any local florist or party store should be able to help you out!


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1 Answers

Hi @pfhs thanks for reaching out! The 5' balloon should be fine for two days of use, without re-inflation, but will have diminishing returns after that. The mylar balloons will generally stay buoyant for 3-5 days, and should stay usable for at least a few days after that (with diminishing lift). The classic kit will let you fly higher and carry heavier cameras, while the mylar balloons will be easier to move (you won't be able to get the inflated 5' balloons into the back of a car, for example, or through a standard door). If either version of the kit seems doable from a practical standpoint, you might want to think about what kinds of images you're hoping to collect: with the classic neoprene kit you can fly higher (and therefore capture a larger field of view), and have more flexibility to use heavier/higher quality cameras, while the mini-kit is a little more portable and may give you all of the height/lift that you need if you're planning to work at a lower altitude. Does this answer your question? We'd love to hear more about what you're planning!


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