Public Lab Research note


Practice reporting suspected frac sand violations

by stevie | July 30, 2019 17:24 | 95 views | 3 comments | #20359 | 95 views | 3 comments | #20359 30 Jul 17:24

Read more: publiclab.org/n/20359


As part of the Sand Sentinel program, we're putting some materials together to use in an in-person training to help people learn about and practice filing suspected frac sand violations.

There are three scenarios in the walkthroughs below. In this activity, participants will use the materials from the Sand Sentinel program to practice identifying and reporting suspected violations. Try them out below! Please leave comments if you have suggestions or edits!

Note: the slides will automatically advance. Use the scroll button on the bottom to go back or forward.

Case Study 1: Jackson County

Case Study 2: Chippewa County

Case Study 3: Barron County


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2 Comments

I did this! Nice work -- this should prove to be useful in facilitating the violations reporting process! Consider editing "Preparing to Report" slides by separating and enlarging the "Report Form" and "Report Form Guide by using 2 separate slides (all 3 case studies). Also, there's a typo on slide 10 of the Barron County Case Study. It should read, DNR vs. DRN. Thank you for creating this reporting process!

Good catch on DNR! I'll edit now. For the other one, people will have full printouts of the folder with them, so they would have the full pages for the "Report Form" and the "report form guide." I agree the full pages look tiny here, but I'm afraid if I split them up, people wouldn't flip the page to see the guide in blue. Maybe I'll change it to show images of just the tops of the pages so they don't look so small? I'll edit it that way in a minute to see how that looks. They're just reference photos.

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