Public Lab Research note


Kites at Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump in Alberta, Canada.

by patcoyle | August 09, 2013 04:55 | 86 views | 0 comments | #8984 | 86 views | 0 comments | #8984 09 Aug 04:55

Read more: publiclab.org/n/8984


9461635507_6b36244417_b.jpg

9461476527_fa1be94a8a_b.jpg

Map and in web viewer follows:

On August 7, 2013, on our drive south from Calgary, we visited the Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump in Alberta, Canada. As we approach the site, we were surprised to see several colorful kites flying as we approached. We rode up from the parking lot on the shuttle with a woman with folding chairs. I asked her whether she was using the chairs to watch the kites or some other events that were at the venue. She explained that she was going to be flying kites as part of a group and would point out the woman who was in charge of it. I had my Levitation 9’ Delta, reel, juice-bottle rig and SX260HS camera in my hand.

When we got off she pointed out, Terry Zee Lee of SkyWindWorld.

I walked to the kite launch area and when she was available I introduced myself. I asked if it would be possible to fly with them and see if I could get some shots of their kites from the air. I had already learned she had commissioned the artistic kites painted by some of the most beloved and talented First Nations artists in Canada and the US, The Flying Buffalo Project, which they were flying at Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump and other buffalo jump sites.

We chatted a few minutes longer about my involvement with Public Lab and her emphasis on STEM education using kites. I said I’d get her the results of my flight.

The embedded playlist below, has videos of the kites, a brief interview with Terry Zee Lee and the sounds of ceremonial drumming and dancing in the background.

I launched my kite, started my camera and got it aloft. It shot over 190 images before the partially discharged battery died.


0 Comments

Login to comment.

Public Lab is open for anyone and will always be free. By signing up you'll join a diverse group of community researchers and tap into a lot of grassroots expertise.

Sign up