Public Lab Research note


Container Testing for Photopaper Test Strips #2

by megan | April 03, 2012 00:17 | 80 views | 2 comments | #1610 | 80 views | 2 comments | #1610 03 Apr 00:17

Read more: publiclab.org/n/1610


Container Test #2 4/1/2012-4/4/4/2012

Purpose: Test light exposure level of treated photo paper on 6 different container designs in one location over a three day period. Fix the exposed paper. Record results.


2 Comments

Hi Guys, So I am preparing now for our hydrogen sulfide experiment coordinating with our Rhus software, and I'm taking a look at the canisters that we received.

From what I can tell, the approach that has been used involves drilling out the holes in the canisters on site, right before placing them. I see two things that could be improved here: (1) making the canisters more reusable. (2) Removing the need to have a drill on site. Also some of the canisters I've received from public labs are clear, but have been wrapped in black tape to stop light from entering. If the canisters were more reusuable, then these clear ones could be avoided entirely, saving another step in preparing them.

Here are a couple of design ideas I have to deal with pre-drilled canisters, which could be tried either exclusively or together: (1) Find another, larger canister that could participate in a 'nesting doll' design. (2) Place many pre-drilled canisters in airtight, black, sealable plastic bag for storage. (3) Find very wide rubber bands that could wrap around the holes and seal them. Perhaps the perfect rubber bands could also be used once removed to attach the canisters to stakes rather than the duct tape that has been used.

Thoughts on this? I may construct a simple experiment to try these out in the next couple of weeks if there isn't something obvious I'm missing.

Is this a question? Click here to post it to the Questions page.

Reply to this comment...


Sorry same comment twice - public labs site was giving an nginx timeout error.

Reply to this comment...


Login to comment.

Public Lab is open for anyone and will always be free. By signing up you'll join a diverse group of community researchers and tap into a lot of grassroots expertise.

Sign up