Public Lab Research note


Big NDVI

by cfastie | July 10, 2013 01:23 | 105 views | 3 comments | #8787 | 105 views | 3 comments | #8787 10 Jul 01:23

Image above: The Canon A810 infrablue camera on Bonanza Bluff.

The infrablue panorama below is stitched from 27 infrablue photos in a 9x3 grid. This is my biggest infrablue image yet. It seemed to be no problem for Ned’s Fiji plugin to open that 86 megapixel image and output the NDVI image below. This is good news for fans of big NDVI maps or images. After automatic or manual aligning and stitching of infrablue photos, the resulting image can be quickly converted into NDVI even if it is very large. We don’t yet know how large.

The panorama is from the Bonanza Bluff overlook at the Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research site near Fairbanks, Alaska. The scene is the floodplain of the Tanana River where forest succession studies have been going on continuously for more than 40 years. Vegetation includes white spruce forests close to the river and black spruce forests closer to the floodplain edges (foreground). Treeless areas are wetlands.

The infrablue A810 with Rosco #74 filter was on a tripod when the 27 overlapping photos were taken. The lens was zoomed in a little in order to get more detail. Although the A810 takes 16 MP photos, I have been using it on the M1 setting for 8 MP photos because that tiny sensor and a polyester filter make 16 MP photos a silly waste of storage. The A810 was custom white balanced on a piece of blue origami paper. [UPDATE: Gigapans don't display here, but you can see it here: http://www.gigapan.com/gigapans/134008]

I am not convinced that the spruce forests in the scene above are really photosynthesizing faster than the treeless wetlands on the floodplain.


3 Comments

Wow. And good news about the plugin handling the larger file size!

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Wow good work! i am still yet to figure out how to use the plug in properly with a VIS and NIR Cameras :(

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Bilco1, Let us know what is not working. There are several people who have the process figured out and I'm sure we can get it working for you. The best place to ask is the infrared forum: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/plots-infrared

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