Public Lab Research note


Link: DIY Microbalance

by Frikkie | March 25, 2015 10:34 | 511 views | 5 comments | #11722 | 511 views | 5 comments | #11722 25 Mar 10:34

Read more: publiclab.org/n/11722


I found this on YOUTUBE and think it is worth sharing.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ta7nlkI5K5g
An accurate balance is a crucial piece of equipment needed for serious analytical work. When preparing reagents such as calibration standards or colour development reagents a good quality balance with a resolution of 0.0001 grams is essential. Good quality analytical balances are rather expensive and can range from $ 1500 - $ 2500. Personally I won’t be tinkering with this concept as I already have an analytical balance. I still think it will be great if a cheap alternative can be developed.


5 Comments

Hi Frikke, Thanks for sharing this! I completely agree that a good analytical balance is key. Hopefully we can ignite some interest in developing this!

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real neat. These are still manufactured too, so we aren't limited to only salvaging parts. http://www.grainger.com/search?searchQuery=Analog+Panel+Meter

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A condenser microphone with a 20 dB noise floor provides a reliably detectable response to about 2x10^-4 Pascals of sound pressure, where normal atmospheric pressure is 105 Pascals. On a 5mm microphone surface, 20dB is equivalent to gravity acting on about 0.1 micrograms. If microphones can be built into integrated circuits cheap enough for cellphones, microgram scales can be made cheaply too. It's only a matter of measuring charge displacement when micrograms push the plates of a condenser closer.

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Ooh, love these ideas!

Also found this:

http://openqcm.com/

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great find don! can't decide between spending $600 or going into their rather prodigious build instructions.

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